Mo 9/11Tu 9/12We 9/13Th 9/14Fr 9/15Sa 9/16Su 9/17
2 Sam. 6
1 Cor. 16
2 Sam. 7
2 Cor. 1
2 Sam. 8–9
2 Cor. 2
2 Sam. 10
2 Cor. 3
2 Sam. 11
2 Cor. 4
2 Sam. 12
2 Cor. 5
2 Sam. 13
2 Cor. 6

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

One of the main themes of 2 Corinthians is opened up by the Apostle Paul at the very beginning of the letter:

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction so that we will be able to comfort those who are in any affliction with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God. For just as the sufferings of Christ are ours in abundance, so also our comfort is abundant through Christ. But if we are afflicted, it is for your comfort and salvation; or if we are comforted, it is for your comfort, which is effective in the patient enduring of the same sufferings which we also suffer; and our hope for you is firmly grounded, knowing that as you are sharers of our sufferings, so also you are sharers of our comfort. (2 Corinthians 1:3–7)

The theme here is comfort in the midst of affliction.

We must first of all understand that our comfort comes from God through Christ. The Lord Jesus provides much comfort for us in our affliction, because He Himself suffered and was afflicted for our sakes. His comforting words are not empty words. He actually knows what it is to sympathize with our weaknesses. There is no suffering you can undergo which He is not able and willing to help you with. He’s not afraid of our suffering.

It is also important to understand that the Lord often uses our brothers and sisters to administer the comfort He gives. They are instruments of comfort in the Lord’s hands. This is especially the case when we are comforted by brothers and sisters who themselves have suffered. Comforting words from someone who has truly suffered loss mean a lot.

Let us humbly receive comfort from our brothers and sisters. It is tempting to wallow in our affliction and to be resistant to someone who wants to help us. Or maybe we’re afraid to be an inconvenience. Or maybe we’re tempted to complain about the shortcomings of other people’s encouraging words. In any case, it’s the Lord’s good pleasure to use others to bear our burdens. We should be grateful when others seek to help, even imperfectly.

Let us also freely give comfort and help to others who are afflicted, especially when we ourselves have suffered. Our suffering is a gift from God which enables us to minister comfort to those who also suffer. Our suffering is not a free pass to avoid others who have difficult burdens to bear. Just the opposite. Christ’s suffering makes Him a better High Priest for our sake. Our suffering makes us better comforters.

VERSES TO MEDITATE ON

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction so that we will be able to comfort those who are in any affliction with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.
—2 Corinthians 1:3–4

HOW TO PRAY

  • Adoration – Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort!
  • Confession – Confess times you have not been willing to help someone in their distress.
  • Thanksgiving – Thank God for specific people who have been ministers of Christ’s comfort to you.
  • Supplication – Ask God for opportunities to comfort others, and for joy in doing so.

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This post by Alex McNeilly

Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are from the New American Standard Bible®, Copyright © 1960, 1971, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation. All rights reserved.

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